Pando

Richard Nieva

  1. For the Internet of things, will it be verticals or horizontals?

    The first step in the adoption of "the Internet of things" – where Web capabilities are implemented into everyday objects – entails making sure there are even products in the first place. But as that ecosystem fills out, one of the next steps is addressing matters of market approach and distribution.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Facebook ponders its place in the Internet of Things

    Amidst all of the buzz surrounding connected devices and ubiquitous computing, there's Facebook, which wants to move beyond connecting mere humans. Cory Ondrejka, Facebook’s director of mobile engineering, says the social network is in a unique position to tie together all of the disparate devices that make up the Internet of things – the category of everyday objects, like scales, toasters, watches, glasses and whatever else you can think of, having wi-fi and data-collecting capabilities. Along the way a number of questions will need to be answered, such as who will receive this information, what usefulness will it have, and how will privacy play out.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  3. What CEOs could learn from comedians

    Those who have seen Twitter CEO Dick Costolo speak know he's a joke machine. But lately, he’s been getting a bit more love for it, thanks to a video of a one-liner-filled commencement address at the University of Michigan that has gotten a lot of attention in tech circles.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  4. RelayRides suspends New York service after cease and desist

    New York State's Department of Financial Services today ordered car-sharing company RelayRides to suspend service in New York state, issuing a cease and desist letter to the company, alleging “repeated false advertising and violation of insurance law" and "putting the public at risk.” The agency also issued a consumer alert, warning New Yorkers that the insurance that RelayRides offers is "illegal and inadequate," which could leave consumers personally financially liable for an accident.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  5. For startups with university roots, an exit is priority number one

    If you’re a startup worried about surviving the Series A crunch, my colleague Erin Griffith has said maybe you should bark up Yahoo’s tree. Tony Stanco, executive director of NCET2, also suggests exits for certain companies. But his rationale is a little different.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  6. RelayRides acquires Wheelz as the car-sharing industry consolidates

    Today the car-sharing startup RelayRides announced its acquisition of former rival Wheelz for an undisclosed amount.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  7. HAXLR8R Demo Day: Lessons from China

    Today the accelerator HAXLR8R held its second-ever demo day in San Francisco. Two things separate it from the usual incubator event. First, it focuses solely on hardware products. Second, HAXLR8R is based in Shenzhen, China, bringing founders and mentors to the city for about three months to learn how to work with factories and manufacturers.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  8. "Space Oddity," atoms, and the intersection of science and art

    I've viewed two videos recently that took my breath away. One gained traction yesterday: a lonesome lament from an astronaut in space, performed by an actual astronaut in space. Canadian commander Chris Hadfield posted a video on YouTube of himself singing a cover of David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” while on the International Space Station. The other was “the world’s smallest movie,” as IBM Research puts it. The R&D organization animated still frames of atoms from carbon monoxide molecules, magnified more than 100 million times. It tells the story of a boy finding companionship with an atom.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  1. Go to page 1.
  2. Go to page 2.
  3. Go to page 3.
  4. Go to page 4.
  5. Go to page 5.
  6. Go to page 27.
  7. Go to page 28.