Pando

antisocial

  1. Shoto wants to make photo sharing more private

    I have more than 1,000 photos on my phone, each organized temporally starting with my first photo in 2007 (a nice shot of my mother) up until my most recent one this morning (a tasty egg I cooked). If I'm bored it's fun to take a stroll down memory lane and see the first few that I snapped, but other than those fleeting moments I rarely interact with my phone album unless I'm uploading a photo to Instagram or Facebook. Additionally, quite often there are photos I simply don't want broadcasted to the entire world.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman , written on

    From the News desk

  2. The time is ripe for a new wave of niche social networks

    Are you fed up seeing pictures of your fishermen friends posing with their catches on Facebook, gardening friends showing off their award-winning roses, and another bird from your birdwatching friend? This could be a very long list. But just hold out. That is all soon going to go away. And if you’re like me you won’t miss it.

    By Johan Attby , written on

    From the News desk

  3. A sports social network that wants to take on Twitter pockets $1.5M in seed money

    Each major league baseball team in the US plays 162 games a season. NBA basketball teams play 82 games a season, as do the NHL hockey teams. The number is 16 for NFL teams, and 34 for major league soccer games. That’s to say nothing of college and high-school sports in all the same categories. ESPN has six TV channels. Ever taken a taxi? Then you’ve heard sports talk radio.

    By Hamish McKenzie , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Protection against the Dark Arts: Ways to better control social content

    Even before it became known that the NSA was tracking citizens' online movements, Web users have been looking for ways to control the information they disseminate online. Since Instragram's controversy over its updated terms of service, people have been looking for ways to share information online while not handing it over to third parties.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman , written on

    From the News desk

  5. You can't quit social networks. Get used to it

    It seems like every week there’s a new study or article published bemoaning our hyper-networked existence. Social media, and Facebook in particular, makes us lonely, fuels FOMO (fear of missing out), and turns our lives into continuous digital highlight reels.

    By Mark McGuire , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Comparing Snapchat's new feature to Facebook misses the point (once again)

    Snapchat has launched a significant new product update today called "Stories." It allows users to stitch their snaps together into a broader story of their day that's also immediate and ephemeral but in a different way. You can watch a story over and over again, but it only spans 24 hours.

    By Sarah Lacy , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Twitter spreads its wings

    Startups are expected to become corporate behemoths that lead a variety of markets. That's why they're called "startups" instead of "small businesses" and are able to raise millions of dollars before turning a profit. They start as itty-bitty companies that do one thing well and, assuming they survive, become sprawling companies that do seemingly everything. Google started as a search company, Facebook was a glorified yearbook, and Amazon used to be an online books seller. Now they're all large, multi-market companies gracing the cover of the Economist.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  8. What in the world is a social network?

    You'd think it would be easy to identify a social network.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

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