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Chromebook Pixel

  1. The most interesting aspect of the new Chromebook: Its charger

    Google has announced another Chromebook. This one was co-designed with HP, features an 11-inch screen, and costs just $279. Anyone curious about Chrome OS, the operating system based entirely on Google's services and the Web, now has a cheap-but-compelling product that can sate their curiosity without busting their wallets. It's not as well-designed as the Chromebook Pixel, the first Chromebook developed solely by Google, but it's also much cheaper and more in-line with the Chromebook's efforts to fill the gap left by the death of the netbook.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  2. How Microsoft, Google, and Square use hardware to market their software and services

    Hardware is becoming an increasingly important aspect of traditionally software-focused companies. Microsoft and Google have both introduced their own hardware over the last year, with the Surface tablets and Chromebook Pixel; Square recently announced the Square Stand, which turns an iPad into a cash register; and Adobe announced its own stylus and a "smart ruler" around the same time it said that its design products would only be available by subscription.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  3. With improved hardware and better Web-based apps, the next Chromebooks could be exciting

    This is the year Google started taking Chromebooks seriously. In February the company introduced the Chromebook Pixel, a touch-screen equipped laptop that costs more than many Windows or OS X-powered notebooks, ending the Chromebook category's status as cheap laptops that happen to run Chrome OS instead of Windows. And now it seems that Google plans to make Chromebooks even more appealing, both by improving the devices themselves with more power and longer battery life and by further blurring the line between Web-based and native-built applications.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Wrist envy: Can Sundar Pichai and his smartwatch finally give Google hardware cred?

    Sundar Pichai taking over Android makes a lot more sense now. The Financial Times reports that Google, like Samsung, LG, Apple, Guoke, and probably a dozen other companies is developing a smartwatch, and that the Android division is in charge of the project. This smartwatch, together with the rumored X Phone and X Tablet, would be among Google's first forays into hardware development, and the first Android-powered (I'm assuming) devices built solely by the Mountain View-based company.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Google dances on Reader's grave with Google Keep

    Hell hath no fury like a Google Reader user scorned, it seems. The popular-but-not-popular-enough RSS reading service has offered a dour backdrop to today's announcement of Google Keep, a note-taking service for Android and the Web. Jokes about Keep's fate have already echoed throughout the Web, creating a new record for the swing from excitement to doubt over a new service.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  6. My 3-year-old nephew gets the Chromebook Pixel, why don't you?

    There's nothing quite like wiping smudges from a laptop display, especially when their origin can be traced back to your 3-year-old nephew's drool-and-god-knows-what-else covered fingers. They don't teach you how to explain the difference between a laptop's screen and a smartphone or tablet's touch-screen at press events, and a toddler doesn't give a damn -- sorry, darn -- about what Steve Jobs said about "gorilla arm" and the problem with vertical touch-screens.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  7. The Chromebook Pixel shows that Chrome OS is for more than Google-branded netbooks

    Google has announced the Chromebook Pixel, a high-end Chrome OS laptop that leaked -- well, kind of -- in January. The Chromebook Pixel, which boasts "the highest pixel density (239 pixels per inch) of any laptop screen on the market today," an optional LTE connection, and 1 terabyte of storage via Google Drive, will cost between $1299 and $1449, much more than other laptops running Chrome OS.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk