Pando

GoBe

  1. CNET drools over the Healbe GoBe, proving there's one gullible journalist born every minute

    For a large chunk of last year, Pando's James Robinson followed the utterly ridiculous story of the even more ridiculous "Healbe GoBe". The device, which raised over a million dollars on Indiegogo, claimed to be able to count the number of calories you had consumed throughout the day by reading blood glucose levels through your wrist.

    By Paul Carr , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Healbe announces "new" investment, "independent" testing, and "shipping" "date"

    After six months in the journalistic trenches with Healbe, the Indiegogo crowdfunders who put the scam into scampaigning, I returned from vacation last week to see they’d a) closed a $2.6 million investment round, b) published independent tests and c) announced that they would begin shipping out their “miracle”, calorie-counting wristbands on September 22.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  3. By allowing the potato salad project to live on, Kickstarter stoops to Indiegogo's level

    Paul Carr has already tackled the latest crowdfunding debacle, in which a Kickstarter project aimed at funding Zack Brown making some potato salad has raised an inexplicable $10,000. Carr notes how the campaign makes his own crowdfunding efforts "look like a bowl of crap." What he didn't say, in quite so many words, is that the project makes what used to be the premier crowdfunding platform look equally shitty.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Weird. After admitting to Pando its GoBe doesn't really work, Healbe wins an actual prize

    Following the story of Healbe and its supposedly calorie counting, $1 million Indiegogo scampaigning GoBe wristband is like watching a weird piece of avant garde cinema. Things happen next to each other without explanation, reason or correlation.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Still short any evidence that the GoBe works, Healbe sets its sights on $210,000 more in pre-sales

    Before we’ve even had a lick of proof that the controversial Healbe GoBe works, before any of its 4,000 backers have been ‘shipped’ their rewards, Healbe is giving 7,000 more people the privilege to ‘buy’ a GoBe for $300.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Hey! Guess What?! Healbe GoBe won't be shipping on time

    Healbe finished up its Indiegogo scampaign for its miracle, calorie-counting wristband on April 15 with promises to ship in June.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  7. One month after getting its million dollars, Healbe's scampaign keeps on stacking up broken promises

    Throughout Moscow-based Healbe’s six week Indiegogo scampaign for its calorie counting GoBe wristband -- which netted over $1m -- red flags appeared at an alarming rate. Doctors and scientists said it was a truly impossible product, hardware experts commented that photos of the Healbe prototypes, a product set to ship in June, looked primitive and messy. The company pretended to be from San Francisco, exaggerated its CES launch and not a soul outside of Healbe could vouch for having seen the product working.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Healbe comes to America, poses for pictures with Indiegogo CEO, still doesn't let anyone test their device

    Following the success of their $1.1m Indiegogo campaign for a scientifically impossible, calorie-counting wristband, Healbe CEO Artem Shipitsin and Managing Director George Mikaberydze took a trip States-side last week.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

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