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google now

  1. The future of search: Answer, converse, anticipate

    Answer. Converse. Anticipate. Those are the verbs that Google believes will lead to "the end of search as we know it." Google doesn't want search to be restricted to a sparse landing page and a specific query. It wants search to become something as ubiquitous as oxygen and as powerful as devices that previously existed only in science fiction.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Google Now on iOS is neither Google nor Now

    By now you've probably heard that Google has brought Google Now, its virtual assistant, to iOS. And it's true -- Google has brought Google Now's most-obvious feature, the information-packed Cards that tell users about the weather, traffic, flight information, and a whole slew of other categories, to the iPhone and iPad. But this isn't the Google Now that's been shipping on Android devices for the last year. It's a less-functional imitation of itself that, despite all that it offers, serves as yet another reminder of how difficult it is to develop comprehensive services on Apple's platform.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Sherpa takes on Google Now and other personal assistants. Here's what's different

    Here’s yet another personal assistant app in a space that is becoming fast crowded -- and where others have died before.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  4. My 3-year-old nephew gets the Chromebook Pixel, why don't you?

    There's nothing quite like wiping smudges from a laptop display, especially when their origin can be traced back to your 3-year-old nephew's drool-and-god-knows-what-else covered fingers. They don't teach you how to explain the difference between a laptop's screen and a smartphone or tablet's touch-screen at press events, and a toddler doesn't give a damn -- sorry, darn -- about what Steve Jobs said about "gorilla arm" and the problem with vertical touch-screens.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Glass is one step closer to a more human Google

    "Welcome to a world through Glass." That's the lead copy on the newly-launched Google Glass -- now just Glass, apparently -- website, which offers the first glimpse at what Glass may look like in the real world.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  6. What will news look like on Google Glass?

    Today, Google bestowed on the world another slickly made advertisement for Google Glass, giving us a better idea of what the wearable computer will look like, and how it will behave, from the user’s perspective. The ad shows people using voice commands to record video, take photos, send messages, conduct video calls, follow directions, access flight information, get weather updates, get translations, find images, and make out with a snake, all projected into a space no larger than a spectacle lens.

    By Hamish McKenzie , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Tempo’s smart calendar is a more focused Google Now

    Raj Singh leads me to the door of a dark room and gestures for me to go inside. It’s a large open area with a floating catwalk that leads to the center of the room, with foamy spikes jutting out from every inch of the floors and wall. It looks like a cross between Cerebro from X-Men and the meeting chamber of the Galactic Senate in Star Wars. (Two geeky references in one sentence. And they said it couldn't be done.)

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Oh, Winston? Read me the news, today's weather forecast, and my friend's status updates

    Let's go ahead and get all of the robot clichés out of the way before we begin: "Domo arigato, Mr. Roboto!" I, Robot. HAL 9000. Skynet. Terminator. Cortana. C3P0. R2D2. "These are not the droids you're looking for." And so on and so forth. Now we can talk about Winston, a robotic personal assistant launching today to will read you your daily news, updates from Twitter and Facebook, and tomorrow's weather.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

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