Pando

Healbe

  1. CNET drools over the Healbe GoBe, proving there's one gullible journalist born every minute

    For a large chunk of last year, Pando's James Robinson followed the utterly ridiculous story of the even more ridiculous "Healbe GoBe". The device, which raised over a million dollars on Indiegogo, claimed to be able to count the number of calories you had consumed throughout the day by reading blood glucose levels through your wrist.

    By Paul Carr

    From the News desk

  2. Indiegogo's PR person doesn't want me to tell you that he's telling you nothing about Indiegogo

    "We strategically manage reputations based on our proven understanding of how and why some stories have impact, while others fade away." - Goldin Solutions Throughout Pando's reporting on Indiegogo scampaigning in 2014 the company has been comically tightlipped. Of 16 requests for comment I've made to the company dating back to the end of March -- on everything from a currently running campaign for the Ritot smartwatch that has banked $1.3 million despite being proven to be complete bullshit, through to Moscow-based Healbe pretending to be from San Francisco -- they've returned just three. (And two of those have been no comments.)

    By James Robinson

    From the News desk

  3. "What has to scale is trust.” Tilt's crowdfunding platform is in it for the long haul

    Having watched as Indiegogo failed to take action on crowdfunding sham after crowdfunding sham this year, seeing Tilt in early September take down the campaign for the Scribble Pen, which had raised $227,000 -- over twice its target -- was refreshing. In a blog post on the company website, co-founder and CEO James Beshara noted that the video for the miraculous pen that could write in any color was misleading and there were discrepancies in the basic information Scribble had provided Tilt. When you consider Healbe pretending to be from San Francisco on Indiegogo, or TellSpec shooting a video with a mock up of its device and pretending that it was a finished, perfected product, Beshara and Tilt were taking a proactive stance to protect integrity in crowdfunding that others have refused to.

    By James Robinson

    From the News desk

  4. Healbe announces "new" investment, "independent" testing, and "shipping" "date"

    After six months in the journalistic trenches with Healbe, the Indiegogo crowdfunders who put the scam into scampaigning, I returned from vacation last week to see they’d a) closed a $2.6 million investment round, b) published independent tests and c) announced that they would begin shipping out their “miracle”, calorie-counting wristbands on September 22.

    By James Robinson

    From the News desk

  5. As backers fume over yet another scampaign, Indiegogo's year from hell keeps getting worse

    2014 seems intent on being the year that breaks Indiegogo, leaving us all shaking our heads that anyone ever thought handing over millions of dollars on an unaccountable platform, for totally unproven hardware was ever a good idea.

    By James Robinson

    From the News desk

  6. One part bad tech to two parts snake oil: Calorie counting devices keep getting more ludicrous

    Scanning the news this morning, when I came to reports of GE’s calorie counting microwave, I almost spat up my coffee. GE researchers have developed a microwave that by scanning the fat, water and weight of the food you’re heating up can work its caloric value.

    By James Robinson

    From the News desk

  7. By allowing the potato salad project to live on, Kickstarter stoops to Indiegogo's level

    Paul Carr has already tackled the latest crowdfunding debacle, in which a Kickstarter project aimed at funding Zack Brown making some potato salad has raised an inexplicable $10,000. Carr notes how the campaign makes his own crowdfunding efforts "look like a bowl of crap." What he didn't say, in quite so many words, is that the project makes what used to be the premier crowdfunding platform look equally shitty.

    By Nathaniel Mott

    From the News desk

  8. Weird. After admitting to Pando its GoBe doesn't really work, Healbe wins an actual prize

    Following the story of Healbe and its supposedly calorie counting, $1 million Indiegogo scampaigning GoBe wristband is like watching a weird piece of avant garde cinema. Things happen next to each other without explanation, reason or correlation.

    By James Robinson

    From the News desk

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