Pando

Healbe

  1. Still short any evidence that the GoBe works, Healbe sets its sights on $210,000 more in pre-sales

    Before we’ve even had a lick of proof that the controversial Healbe GoBe works, before any of its 4,000 backers have been ‘shipped’ their rewards, Healbe is giving 7,000 more people the privilege to ‘buy’ a GoBe for $300.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Hey! Guess What?! Healbe GoBe won't be shipping on time

    Healbe finished up its Indiegogo scampaign for its miracle, calorie-counting wristband on April 15 with promises to ship in June.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  3. One month after getting its million dollars, Healbe's scampaign keeps on stacking up broken promises

    Throughout Moscow-based Healbe’s six week Indiegogo scampaign for its calorie counting GoBe wristband -- which netted over $1m -- red flags appeared at an alarming rate. Doctors and scientists said it was a truly impossible product, hardware experts commented that photos of the Healbe prototypes, a product set to ship in June, looked primitive and messy. The company pretended to be from San Francisco, exaggerated its CES launch and not a soul outside of Healbe could vouch for having seen the product working.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Have crowdfunding horror stories ruined it for everyone?

    Fool me once, shame on me. Fool me twice? Nuh-huh. Never going to happen.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Consumer Physics' Kickstarter campaign shows that not all crowd funding has to be a dishonest mystery

    As soon as the Kickstarter-campaign for the handheld SCiO molecular sensor went live yesterday – launched by Tel Aviv-based Consumer Physics – I started receiving messages calling scam. The SCiO is a small infrared spectrometer that scans foods and supplies a breakdown to an app of their nutritional information. It's identical to what Tellspec set out to do on Indiegogo, raising $386,392 in dishonest fashion with little idea about how to put the technology into action.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Healbe comes to America, poses for pictures with Indiegogo CEO, still doesn't let anyone test their device

    Following the success of their $1.1m Indiegogo campaign for a scientifically impossible, calorie-counting wristband, Healbe CEO Artem Shipitsin and Managing Director George Mikaberydze took a trip States-side last week.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Asurvest thinks it has found a way to protect people from the murky dangers of crowdfunding

    The concept of crowdfunding insurance seems partly ridiculous. My first thought upon hearing about it, was the old Family Guy episode where a salesman tricks Peter Griffin into buying volcano insurance. Just do your research and don’t move next to an active volcano (or back shady crowdfunding campaigns), right?

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Indiegogo moves on from Healbe PR disaster by locking a woman out of her account when she asked for a refund

    For Moscow-based Healbe the hard part of its controversial Indiegogo campaign for a scientifically impossible, calorie counting activity tracker is over. It gets to walk off into the sunset with $1m and no actionable legal risk, even if it makes no attempt to go into production.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  1. Go to page 1.
  2. Go to page 2.
  3. Go to page 3.
  4. Go to page 4.