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messengerseries

  1. The future of work communication is nigh, and it is full of texts

    The future of enterprise communication is nigh, and it is full of texts. Did you see the word enterprise and tune out? Come back little lamb. When I say "enterprise" I mean businesses big and small, perhaps even the very company you work for. The way we communicate at work impacts anyone with a job, and new forms are emerging.

    By Carmel DeAmicis , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Desktop problems: Why the messaging revolution sucks for PC users

    My fiancée must think I hate her. I haven't responded to her requests to thumbkiss -- press my thumb against my smartphone at the same moment she does the same with hers -- or seen any of the messages she's sent me via Couple, a "relationship app for two" we sometimes use to stay in touch. For someone whose job requires that the smartphone never be more than a few feet away, I kinda suck at promptly responding to these messages.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  3. The new Facebook lives in China

    We’ve said it before, but because we’re just wrapping up a special report about mobile chat, it’s worth saying again. WeChat is, like, the biggest thing ever.

    By Hamish McKenzie , written on

    From the News desk

  4. TigerText takes its secure messaging platform freemium, targeting both enterprises and consumers

    Mobile messaging is growing like a weed. But it’s not just teens sending stickers, emoticons, and LOLs that have made the category among the hottest anywhere in the tech sector. Businesses are increasingly relying on new digital messaging solutions to carry out their day-to-day tasks.

    By Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Identity evangelist: Burner gets $2M to help consumers reclaim control of their mobile communications

    Welcome to the privacy era. Perhaps it’s a response to the ubiquity of Facebook, but the pendulum appears to have swung in the direction of anonymity and pseudonymity online. Look no further than the explosion of Snapchat and Whisper, two social services that allow users to post content without the fear of judgement or adverse consequences – both of which, incidentally, happen to be LA-based startups.

    By Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Frankly wants us to chat like no one's listening

    There's a lot to dislike about "The Social Network," Aaron Sorkin's gloomy film about Facebook's founding. The characters speak like they've just done a line off a book of witticisms. Nobody seems to know how to turn on a light. And some things didn't happen quite as they were portrayed in the movie: Mark Zuckerberg -- spoiler alert -- didn't refresh his ex-girlfriend's Facebook page as he pouted in a dimly-lit boardroom.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Chat's influence on email extends to the desktop with Unibox

    Email, to hear seemingly every technology writer tell it, has been waiting to be disrupted for the last decade or so. Enterprise-focused social networks like Yammer promise to kill email's dominance in the workforce; messaging apps threaten to replace email on consumers' smartphones; and hermits pledge to send messages via smoke signals and bird calls instead of email. (I might be making that last one up.)

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Playing the long game: why one company chose product over growth

    After 19 months of waiting, Faizan Buzdar finally got approved for his green card. Along the way, he attracted the attention of the White House, who featured Faizan in a video pushing for immigration reform. “Faizan,” Barack Obama tweeted, “is a perfect example of why we need #ImmigrationReform.”

    By Carmel DeAmicis , written on

    From the News desk

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