Pando

NSA

  1. The worth of a trillion pictures

    So the NSA knows whom we call and how long we talk to them. Depending on whom you believe, they might even have access to our emails and social communications. Some find this troubling and an invasion of our privacy. Others, however, are not really surprised or shocked.

    By Parham Aarabi , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Chris "moot" Poole updates drawing app, says things about the NSA

    Chris “moot” Poole has been running 4chan, the anonymous bulletin board that has grown into its own subculture, as a kind of intense hobby project since he was a teenager. But it was never a business. It was funded, he says, by “Bank of Mom.” Canvas, a VC-backed image board with editing tools, was supposed to be that business, the thing that turned moot from “Time-anointed Internet hero” to “Time-anointed Internet hero who can pay his own rent.”

    By Hamish McKenzie , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Connecting the dots: Facebook shows the world how much it knows about them

    You've gotta give Facebook credit for its relentless drive to harvest and exploit the data of its billion users. Facebook knows where you are, where you're from, the places you Like, the people you know, and what you're interested in -- as soon as it makes its way to wearable computers it'll probably know when you're sleeping or awake, like a technologically twisted version of Santa Claus. The company is making some of that data easier to discover with Graph Search, a social search tool that will begin rolling out to all US-based Facebook users today.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  4. "Restore the 4th" is nice, but to really support online privacy, be like Twitter

    Today, thousands of websites, including Reddit, Wordpress, Imgur, and Cheezburger, are participating in an online protest against NSA surveillance. It's called "Restore the 4th" (as in, the 4th amendment against unlawful search and seizure) and the Internet Defense League says it will be the largest "online protest since SOPA." There are no major blackouts planned, but numerous sites have added a splash page to their homescreen prompting users to sign an online petition against "unconstitutional surveillance of Internet users."

    By David Holmes , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Google Mine (if it's real) could be the best or the worst thing to happen to the sharing economy

    When was the last time you asked yourself, “I wonder which of my neighbors has a leaf blower?” or, “which of my friends has timeshare in Cabo?” or “...a poker table?” or “...the full Star Wars collection on Blue-ray?” or “...snowboard boots in a size 11?" It’s a common occurrence, especially as the sharing economy grows in size and importance. But technology has yet to make this sort of information instantly sharable.

    By Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Pindrop Security raises $11M from A16Z and others to help prevent phone fraud

    When it comes to online security, often times the greatest vulnerabilities aren’t technical, but human. Unfortunately, social engineering can be the hardest type of attack to prevent. It was the method behind the catastrophic hacking of Wired reporter Mat Honan, the exploits of the Syrian Electronic Army, and the cyber-espionage by China’s People's Liberation Army.

    By Michael Carney , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Edward Snowden’s Catch-22: a Pando meta media mashup

    Lots, lots, has been written about Edward Snowden, who leaked information that had been classified "top secret" detailing US surveillance programs run by the National Security Agency. It's been all over the news, on TV, radio, in newspapers, online and raining down on the blogosphere. So we sifted through all that opinion so you don’t have to, to bring you a curated mash up of the great Snowden/NSA debate, every sentence taken from someone else. It’s the ultimate hyperlinked aggregation, a veritable clickapalooza, a teeming mass of hyperlink madness.

    By Adam L. Penenberg , written on

    From the News desk

  8. What, me worry? The NSA is working on powerful quantum computing technology

    As the NSA snoopapalooza continues into its second week, much has been made of its vaunted Utah Data Center, a billion-dollar facility spanning 1.5 million square feet that can process data on the order of zettabytes, or 10^21 bytes. (That's 10 to the 21st power. If you know how exponents work, that's a hell of a lot of bytes).

    By David Holmes , written on

    From the News desk

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