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patentsmackdown

  1. Proposed FTC study on patent trolls pushes reform one step closer

    The Federal Trade Commission has proposed a study that would put patent trolls under the microscope and possibly force some to be more transparent about their business practices.

    By Hamish McKenzie , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Patent approval has been rising, but that doesn't necessarily mean more innovation

    The percentage of patents that the United States Patent and Trades Office (USPTO) has risen dramatically. But does this mean that American inventiveness has reached a new high? Not quite. In fact, it's actually the opposite. It speaks to the current methods the USPTO has adopted when considering patent applications, and the way patent lawyers may be operating to ensure patent approval.

    By Cale Guthrie Weissman , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Article One Partners brings the crowd to a patent fight

    Perhaps the most compelling tips from our step-by-step guide to slaughtering patent trolls are to "do your research" and to "team up with other companies fighting the same troll." Not because they're new ideas, but because the same tactics have been employed in global conflicts and schoolyard squabbles for years.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Yikes! comScore CEO assaults a Moat employee during patent deposition

    Patent warfare is fairly dry stuff. Following along requires the navigation of tedious legalese. Very little action happens. It takes a great storyteller like Laura Sydell and NPR to explain the stakes in an engaging way.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  5. RPX and the complicated business of stockpiling patents for good, not evil

    Patent warfare is a big business. A big, big business. $29 billion a year big. Massive. And patent warfare driven by patent trolls is only a recent development. Check out this chart: money spent on patent litigation against patent trolls (aka, NPEs, the sanitized industry term) has doubled in the last five years.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  6. So, Laura Sydell, what do you really think of Nathan Myhrvold?

    Much of the summer we've been digging into the current situation with patents -- and proposed changes to make it worse for trolls and more fair to real innovators.

    By Sarah Lacy , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Government report finds "patent troll" narrative not straightforward

    Yesterday, the Government Accountability Office released a report on patent infringement litigation, but its findings didn't align precisely with what fighters of "patent trolls" might have been hoping to hear.

    By Hamish McKenzie , written on

    From the News desk

  8. The first step to fighting patent trolls is to limit software patents to five years

    There’s a lot wrong with America’s patent system -- it often serves to undercut innovation, limits competition, and rewards trolls. But there’s a relatively easy short-term fix: Cap software patents at five years from issuance, a position adapted from the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s (EFF) Defend Innovation Project. While comprehensive legislation is needed to fix patent law, this first step is critical to reviving and protecting entrepreneurship, R&D, and technological progress in the United States.

    By Jeff Canter , written on

    From the News desk

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