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scanadu

  1. Can connected devices change the world?

    There's been plenty of talk about how connected devices can help each of us individually. Fitness trackers like the Fitbit Flex, Jawbone Up, and Nike+ FuelBand are meant to help you finally get in shape. Nest's learning thermostat promises to lower your energy bill by up to 20 percent. A connected home might be able to tell you when the laundry is done, can lock the doors and turn off the lights when you go to sleep, or allow everyday objects to communicate with you and each other. But can connected devices be used for something beyond our narrow interests?

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Is the Internet of Things the future of narcissism?

    I'm surprised that Time didn't force the selfie-taking millennial on its cover about the "ME ME ME" generation to wear a fitness tracker, the new epitome of data-driven narcissism.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Scanadu asks Indiegogo users to test its "tricorder," but don't call it a pre-order

    Scanadu, the healthcare company trying to build a real-world version of "Star Trek's" tricorder, is looking to raise $100,000 on Indiegogo, but it would prefer that you don't refer to its campaign as crowd-funding or pre-ordering its Scout device. It's using Indiegogo to crowd-source the hunt for willing participants in a usability trial required by FDA -- the money is secondary, or at least that's how Scanadu views the initiative.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  4. MediSafe helps families and physicians make sure those pills get taken

    It's amazing how easily people forget to take the medications that allow them to, you know, live. Pharmaceutical companies have literally manufactured pills that will solve many of our problems, but the simple act of removing medicine from its container and putting it in our mouths remains elusive. They should make a pill that helps people remember to take their pills.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Scanadu officially launches to build technologically-savvy healthcare

    That was in 2010. This experience motivated de Brouwer, who previously acted as CEO of One Laptop Per Child Europe and founded numerous companies before abandoning the Valley after the dot-com bust, to re-enter the technology ecosystem. He uprooted his family from Brussels, where he had "taken over a small banking company and turned it into a big one" after the bubble burst, came back to the Valley, and went to work. Scanadu, which is based at the NASA-Ames Research Center, is the culmination of those efforts.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk