Pando

Surveillance Valley

  1. Pew: Most Americans don't trust private companies or government agencies with their data

    Pew reports that a majority of Americans (roughly 65 percent) believe there are inadequate restrictions on government data collection. Many others have also complained about the amount of data held by online advertisers, social sites, video streaming services, search companies, and other online service providers.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Former Homeland Security head tells Pando why he doesn't trust his fitness data to the cloud

    Michael Chertoff is one of the millions of Americans who use fitness trackers to accompany them when they exercise. In his case, when he runs.

    By Andy Meek , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Internet privacy, funded by spooks: A brief history of the BBG

    For the past few months I've been covering U.S. government funding of popular Internet privacy tools like Tor, CryptoCat and Open Whisper Systems. During my reporting, one agency in particular keeps popping up: An agency with one of those really bland names that masks its wild, bizarre history: the Broadcasting Board of Governors, or BBG.

    By Yasha Levine , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Support Yasha Levine's "Surveillance Valley" — a book about how Silicon Valley created the world's most effective surveillance apparatus

    As regular Pando readers know, for the past year-and-a-half I've been covering the "Surveillance Valley" beat — investigating the for-profit surveillance business that powers Silicon Valley and the way this technology is increasingly being used to monitor and control our lives.

    By Yasha Levine , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Regulators demand more transparency from tech firms that track users

    European regulators have published an opinion arguing that website operators should disclose all methods employed to track consumers around the Web, instead of only having to inform visitors when they're being tracked via "cookies."

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

  6. How leading Tor developers and advocates tried to smear me after I reported their US Government ties

    “I contract for the United States Government to build anonymity technology for them and deploy it.”

    By Yasha Levine , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Google is the biggest corporate lobbyist in America now, says new Public Citizen report

    I’ve been in Boston all week. I had to tell my mother where I was, but not Google. Its seamlessness in switching up my Google ad results, changing its suggestions to me of places to visit and ads to click on, was instantaneous.

    By James Robinson , written on

    From the News desk

  8. Camera obscura: Harvard's attendance research shows not all surveillance is digital

    It was revealed last week that Harvard monitored the attendance of some 2,000 students by taking a picture of the seating arrangement in 10 lecture halls every minute. The images are said to have been destroyed, but the data gleaned from them was used in research presented during a conference at the college earlier this year. Students whose images were captured as part of the research will be informed, "using enrollment data," of their unwitting involvement.

    By Nathaniel Mott , written on

    From the News desk

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