Pando

techtopus

  1. UPDATED: Google begged Steve Jobs for permission to hire engineers for its new Paris office. Guess what happened next...

    Today I'm in San Jose, attending a hearing in the salary fixing lawsuit brought against Apple, Google and other tech giants. I'll have more on that soon.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Newly unsealed documents show Steve Jobs' brutal response after getting a Google employee fired

    In early March, 2007, as Google was expanding fast and furiously, one of its recruiters from the “Google.com Engineering” group made a career-ending mistake: She cold-contacted an Apple engineer by email, violating the secret and illegal non-solicitation compact that her boss, Eric Schmidt, had agreed with Apple’s Steve Jobs.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  3. The actions of the Techtopus would have had Karl Marx choking on his cornflakes

    The actions of the Techtopus, as detailed here at Pando by Mark Ames, would have had Marx choking on his cornflakes. Or at least screaming "I told you! I told you this would happen!" For this is exactly what he meant by "monopoly capitalism" -- and was the end state of capitalism that he wanted so desperately to warn us against.

    By Tim Worstall , written on

    From the News desk

  4. Revealed: Apple and Google's wage-fixing cartel involved dozens more companies, over one million employees

    “British medieval ordinances of Bristol cobblers in 1364 state, ‘Masters are forbidden to poach workers from other members of the craft.’”

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  5. Steve Jobs threatened Palm’s CEO, plainly and directly, court documents reveal

    Another lesson from the Silicon Valley wage theft suit, which I first reported here, is what can happen to even powerful tech CEOs who make the fatal mistake of standing up to monopoly power. It’s a lesson former Palm Inc CEO Edward Colligan learned the hard way.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Meet the man Silicon Valley's CEOs turn to when they want to justify screwing workers

    Late last month, I revealed the contents of court documents which show the illegal fixing of salaries by some of Silicon Valley’s largest companies, and most respected CEOs. Such brazen, and meticulously documented, anti-competitive behavior by the likes of Steve Jobs and Eric Schmidt was hard to believe, let alone justify.

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

  7. The only vulnerability of the mighty "Techtopus" collusion plot

    Mark Ames' post on some of the most revered figures in Silicon Valley nakedly breaking antitrust laws -- and emailing one another admitting as much along the way -- has not only been one of our highest read stories of the week, it's likely going to be one of our highest read stories of all time.

    By Sarah Lacy , written on

    From the News desk

  8. The Techtopus: How Silicon Valley's most celebrated CEOs conspired to drive down 100,000 tech engineers' wages

    In early 2005, as demand for Silicon Valley engineers began booming, Apple's Steve Jobs sealed a secret and illegal pact with Google's Eric Schmidt to artificially push their workers wages lower by agreeing not to recruit each other's employees, sharing wage scale information, and punishing violators. On February 27, 2005, Bill Campbell, a member of Apple's board of directors and senior advisor to Google, emailed Jobs to confirm that Eric Schmidt "got directly involved and firmly stopped all efforts to recruit anyone from Apple."

    By Mark Ames , written on

    From the News desk

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