3b7d703a85d6461b2f0b2b02dc400bcaWell, this is fun. Maybe it’s the fact that spring has finally sprung in New York; maybe it’s the fact that the app bills itself as “for awful people.” But Snap, Snap, Go! is my new favorite game. Today, at least.

It’s one of those time-wasters with no point other than silliness. Which is the basic use case for Snapchat, Draw Something and any other myriad of big hits. In fact, the best possible fate for Snap, Snap, Go! would be to wind up like Draw Something, with a lightening-fast adoption, followed by a lightening-fast sale, followed by lightening-fast abandonment. In that order.

That’s fine for now — the game is a side project and not necessarily a company. Geoff Stearns, former tech lead for YouTube’s video player team, built a version of it a year ago with Ajay Chainani, formerly of Sonar and Brian Pelayo, formerly of Small Knot; recently they decided to revive it.

Here’s how it works:

After you sign up and authorize adding friends from Facebook or Twitter, you can do two different things: You can start a game with a friend or stranger, or you can judge someone else’s game. The games are simple: Snap, Snap, Go! gives you a sentence with a blank in it, and you snap a photo that fills in the blank.

Sample prompts include “____ ate my homework,” and “I got 99 problems, but ___ ain’t one,” and “I wish I had a vending machine for _____.” Once you and your challenger snap your photos, a random selection of the app’s users vote on which one they like best. Stearns and team create the prompts, purposely making them related to meme and Internet-related humor. It was inspired, somewhat, by Cards Against Humanity. It’s also a bit like an open-ended Apples to Apples.

And like Cards Against Humanity, it’s only as funny, awkward or awful as its players make it. The more, the better.

mzl.cqwdzuhj.320x480-75 mzl.fxnpwhno.320x480-75 mzl.vadxpthx.320x480-75