Pando

April 2013

  1. Teachers first: How Schoology is changing the way schools buy technology

    Edtech is a tricky beast for many reasons. One major challenge I've focused on during our online education month is the business model.

    By Erin Griffith , written on

    From the News desk

  2. Kia ora e hoa ma: PandoDaily is in New Zealand

    Last week, PandoDaily brought you Australia (more stories to come), this week we go even further towards the Antarctic to bring you a country of even more modest size and first-rate flat whites (which, for the uninitiated, is a style of coffee y'all should be drinking). The native Maori people call it Aotearoa, "Land of the Long White Cloud," but most other people just call it New Zealand. (That headline, by the way, is written in Maori. It means "Greetings to all my friends.") It also happens to be my home country, which kind of explains why I'm here for a couple of weeks. I'll be in Wellington this week and Auckland in the middle of May.

    By Hamish McKenzie , written on

    From the News desk

  3. Are LA investors afraid of risk?

    Yesterday, Michael Carney wrote a post dissecting the findings of Built in LA's Digital Startup Report. The big takeaways? 220 startups launched out of LA last year and the ecosystem as a whole raised $847 million.

    By David Holmes , written on

    From the News desk

  4. The joy of stereotyping venture capitalists

    As a kid, I put things into buckets to categorize them. I'm a mathematician, so this always made sense to me. I'd look at a horse, a donkey, and a mule and say, "Yup. Got it. File it in my memory bank.” Then my mother would point out a zebra, and my brain would implode. Thanks Mom.

    By Philip Beauregard , written on

    From the News desk

  5. The Internet generation teaches the next generation

    For the first time in the history of education, young teachers entering the field are people who have grown up with the Internet (even though, for a long time, it was AOL’s version of the Internet. Still counts.). That’s kind of an obvious statement, but its implications shouldn’t be overlooked.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

  6. Invest in people, not resources

    There is a supply-and-demand paradox brewing in the software business, and it’s getting worse by the day. Companies are searching for rock-star talent, while at the exact same moment talented people are searching for great work. People on both sides of this issue are frustrated -- companies can’t find the right workers, or enough of them and talented workers feel stifled, bored, and in many cases exhausted, and even oppressed, by the work they do find.

    By Bob Gower , written on

    From the News desk

  7. Hard yakka: Why Atlassian's founders are the pride of Australia's startup world

    A few years ago, Mike Cannon-Brookes was invited to speak to a student entrepreneurial society at a Sydney university. The co-founder of Atlassian, one of Australia's most successful software companies, showed up to the venue in cut-off jeans and a T-shirt. One of the workers who was setting up the venue mistook him for IT support. When Cannon-Brookes walked in the room, the worker asked the scruffy entrepreneur if he could get the projector, which was acting up, to work. Not one to disappoint, Cannon-Brookes said "Sure," and fixed it.

    By Hamish McKenzie , written on

    From the News desk

  8. CreativeLIVE gives online education a Hollywood touch

    In Mika Salmi’s classrooms, instead of a bell signaling class has begun, a producer yells loudly “15 seconds to live...” and begins to count down. And it’s not so much a classroom, but a production studio.

    By Richard Nieva , written on

    From the News desk

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