Pando

Amazon's reportedly planning its own line of grocery products and household items

By Nathaniel Mott , written on May 29, 2015

From The News Desk

Amazon isn't content selling household goods from other companies -- it wants to offer its own branded products as well, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The company is said to be focusing on a variety of goods that will be marketed under its Elements brand. (Apparently fire-related branding is restricted to the company's e-book readers, set-top boxes, and budget tablets or smartphones.)

Among those products are baby food, household cleaners, milk, and others. Here's a partial list of products the Journal believes Amazon is working on:

Earlier this month, Amazon sought trademark protection for more than two dozen categories under its Elements brand, including coffee, soup, pasta, water, vitamins, dog food and household items like razors and cleaning products. Diapers and baby wipes—the latter of which is still on the market—were Amazon’s first line of Elements, available to customers who pay $99 a year for a Prime unlimited shipping membership.
These products would follow Amazon's increasing efforts to sell groceries, household goods, and other items to consumers who might have previously restricted their Amazon purchases to electronic goods or hard-to-find items.

Some of those efforts have included the expansion of Amazon's grocery service, the introduction of a Dash product that lets people speak their grocery lists, and the announcement of Dash Buttons that turn people into mindless consumers.

But they've also included the release of Elements-branded diapers, and that didn't work out so well. Amazon pulled the products from its virtual shelves less than two months after their introduction after numerous quality complaints.

Perhaps these products will fare better than Amazon's little shit-satchels. But even if they don't, at least they'll show that Amazon views household items as more than just an experiment. If that were the case, it wouldn't be working so hard to establish itself as the go-to place for the items people buy every day.

[illustration by Brad Jonas]